Produced by the United States Mint, Gold Eagle coins were minted for the first time in 1986. They became very popular thereafter, to the point of eclipsing the South African Krugerrands, which had remained the only benchmark in the investment market for gold coins for a long time.

American Gold Eagle Coins: Resistant and Guaranteed

The American Gold Eagle coins are made of gold and a small quantity of copper and silver, which gives them a slightly dark shade. Since the mid-1980’s, with the boycott of Krugerrands by several Western countries, they have become more and more popular with investors. There are four denominations available for Eagles: 50 $, 25 $, 10 $ and 5 $. These face values correspond to the amount of gold in each coin: the 1/10oz coin has a face value of 5 $, the 1/4oz coin 10 $, the 1/2oz coin 25 $, and the 1oz coin 50 $. However, these dollar amounts are purely symbolic and, consequently, do not reflect the true value of the coins, which are more expensive to buy or to sell.

These coins are struck with 22-carat gold, which makes them less pure than Canada’s Maple Leaf coins, but they are more shock resistant, due to the silver and copper added to the gold, and they are also, to a certain point, more resistant to scratches. Thus the risk of losing value due to some degradation is minimal. Moreover, they are guaranteed by the government of the United States, which increases investors’ trust, knowing they are buying real value at a fair price. The government of the United States controls the purity, amount and weight of each bullion coin minted by the United States Mint.

American Gold Eagle: Designed as a Tribute to America’s Founding Myths

The obverse of the American Gold Eagle features the founding myth of the United States, personified by the Statue of Liberty. In one hand, Lady Liberty holds an olive branch, symbol of peace, and in the other, a torch. The word “Liberty” is engraved at the top, and the rays in the background refer to sunrise. At the foot of the Statue of Liberty is a representation of the Capitol, the United States’ parliament, symbolising the sovereignty of the American people.

The reverse shows a family of eagles, one of which holds an olive branch in its claws. The name “United States of America” is on top, “In God We Trust” is on the right side, and a latin phrase, “E Pluribus Unum”, is on the left. Also, on the reverse, you will find the coin’s weight in ounces and its nominal value. The reverse of the American Gold Eagle was designed by the sculptor Miley Busiek.

American Gold Eagle Coins: Quality Investment Coins

American Gold Eagle coins are recognised as being very liquid investments, which means they can be readily exchanged for cash on the markets. Being guaranteed by the American government, they enjoy tremendous trust among buyers, and especially the novice buyers who have a high aversion to risk. It seems also that the economy’s global situation is favouring a return to gold. Gold remains a safe haven in times of crises, for many. This translates in reality to an increase in the sales of gold and silver coins, which are relatively more accessible than bars. In the United States, as in the rest of the world, coin sales are increasing year after year.

Furthermore, some American Gold Eagle coins might also become collectibles sought for by collectors, such as the 1/4oz and 1/2oz coins issued in 1991, or the $20 “Double Eagle” gold coin. The lack of trust in the economy, globalised and financialised, will, no doubt, increase their already immense popularity.

Obverse: A proud Lady Liberty
Reverse: An eagle in flight carrying an olive branch and a female awaits with her young.
Weight: 33,9310gr
Fine weight: 1 ounce (31.1035gr)
Fineness: 916/1,000
Diameter: 32.7mm
Thickness2.87
Minted since 1986
Legal Tender Value: 50$

There are four denominations available for Eagles: 50 $, 25 $, 10 $ and 5 $. These face values correspond to the amount of gold in each coin: the 1/10oz coin has a face value of 5 $, the 1/4oz coin 10 $, the 1/2oz coin 25 $, and the 1oz coin 50 $. However, these dollar amounts are purely symbolic and, consequently, do not reflect the true value of the coins, which are more expensive to buy or to sell.

The prices from different broker